Guyenet and Hall demonstrate that what does happen cannot really happen

(versión en español: pinchar aquí)

NOTE: a calorexic is a person that believes in the energy balance pseudoscience.

I reproduce below a text from Woo’s blog. Its authors are Stephan Guyenet, Kevin Hall and a third author. The bold type hightlighting is mine.

If decreased circulating fuels caused the development of common human obesity as described by the CIM, then experimentally decreasing circulating fuels should result in increased energy intake, decreased energy expenditure, and body fat accumulation. The drug acipimox reduces FFA levels by mimicking the effect of insulin to inhibit adipocyte lipolysis. In a 6-month trial, acipimox induced a persistent 38% reduction of plasma FFA levels in adults with obesity but did not impact energy or macronutrient intake, resting energy expenditure, or body composition. Thus, a key prediction of the CIM was not experimentally supported.

Woo argues that not to use results from insulin experiments, when it is clearly possible to do so, when they want to demonstrate something about insulin is a clear attempt to deceive (see). She obviously has a point, because it is difficult to understand how they do something like this.

Basically what the argument of Hall and Guyenet says is that no physiological factor can be fattening per se, because it would increase energy intake, reduce energy expenditure and fat accumulation would happen. According to these authors, since in a specific experiment with the drug acipimox none of the three things was observed, they deduce that it cannot happen in any case, including insulin.

In my opinion, to use a drug (acipimox) instead of insulin to demonstrate something about insulin, is quite relevant, since the extension of those results to a different physiological factor, such as insulin, necessarily implies that what they want to establish is a general principle valid for any supposedly fattening physiological factor. Otherwise, Hall and Guyenet would have only used experimental results related to insulin. What their text conveys is that they are questioning the causality of the carbohydrate-insulin model. That is the reason why they talk about the reduction of circulating fuels, something not necessarily caused by insulin, and they use a physiological factor different from insulin. They are trying to establish a general principle, which, according to them, the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis fails to fulfill.

In short, their argument is that:

no physiological factor can produce energy accumulation in a tissue

because according to them neither the caloric intake nor the energy expenditure nor the accumulation of fat can be altered by a physiological factor. If they thought they could be altered, they would not use acipimox instead of insulin. I insist that it is the causality of the carbohydrate-insulin theory what they try to make believe that has no experimental support:

A key prediction of the CIM was not experimentally supported.

The argument is not limited to adipose tissue, since the accumulation of energy in any format and in any tissue within the body must have the same consequences from the point of view of the energy balance equation. And they clearly speak of “decreased circulating fuels” which is common to any tissue that stores metabolites. If it is argued that it cannot happen for adipose tissue, then it cannot happen for any tissue, since the effects on the terms of the energy balance equation of the accumulation/release of metabolites in a tissue are, a priori, similar for all tissues. Otherwise, their argument would be that when, for example, the liver accumulates fat there is no problem for the body due to having a little less fat to use, but that same body does not know what to do with a gram less of dietary fat when it is stored in the adipose tissue. Nonsense.

I suppose that at this point you are already asking yourself how is it possible that they are arguing this. They are Hall and Guyenet: that is the only explanation. It is time now to analyse their argument. My analysis is structured in the following sections:

  1. The main argument is a straw man
  2. It is false that they are talking about a key concept of the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis
  3. If you want to know if there is fattening, look if there is fattening
  4. It is false that there must be effects in the terms of the energy balance
  5. Do we apply this criterion to other accumulations of energy in tissues?
  6. It is false that it has to happen. Other reasons
  7. Apart from being false, it is not measurable and may be never will be
  8. The CICO theory cannot explain the scientific results
  9. Conclusion

1. The main argument is a straw man

If decreased circulating fuels caused the development of common human obesity as described by the CIM, then experimentally decreasing circulating fuels should result in increased energy intake, decreased energy expenditure, and body fat accumulation.

Does the decreased circulating fuels cause accumulation of body fat? Let’s think about it for a moment. Is that what the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis says?!!! Really? Let’s look at the figure, taken from an article that defends the carbohydrate-insulin model: do we see what causes the accumulation of body fat in that model?

The irrelevant, unnecessary and possibly non-existent decreased circulating fuels, is a possible consequence —a symptom that may not even exist!— of the accumulation of body fat, not its cause! Have you ever read an advocate of the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis say that we gain weight because circulating fuels are reduced? Does this argument really have three authors? Have they no shame? Have they no shame?!!! Are they really twisting what the carbohydrate-insulin model really says in this way?

Moreover, the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis says that insulin causes accumulation of triglycerides in the adipose tissue, triglycerides that would no longer be available to other tissues, for example to be dissipated as heat in muscle tissue (see,see). If there is no fattening, it is absurd to suggest that the circulating fuel will be reduced due to fattening. Can it be used to question that that causality is possible, an experiment with acipimox that, according to Hall and Guyenet, did not cause changes in body composition!!? What changes in energy intake and energy expenditure can we expect to find in these conditions? What changes?!!!! And they argue that the reduction of circulating fuels, which supposedly is the consequence of gaining weight, also did not cause weight gain. And that there were no effects on the energy balance terms caused by a fattening that did not happen for them is proof that … Fuck Hall and Guyenet!!!

Note that if they had not attributed to the carbohydrate-insulin model a false causality, different from the one actually proposed by this model, they could not have talked about the experiment with acipimox, because in the absence of fattening they could not justify their search for effects in the terms of the energy balance equation. That search only exists from the moment they make up that fattening is produced by a reduction of the circulating fuels. And that is a lie.

Moreover, it is the CICO theory the one that proposes that a decreased circulating fuels forces the adipocytes to release body fat, that is, makes us lose weight.

That is, Hall and Guyenet falsely attribute a fake causality to the carbohydrate-insulin model but that causality is the causality of their own model.

The drug acipimox reduces FFA levels by mimicking the effect of insulin to inhibit adipocyte lipolysis. In a 6-month trial, acipimox induced a persistent 38% reduction of plasma FFA levels

If in a drug experiment circulating free fatty acids are systematically reduced, if that does not result in a reduction in body weight, the causality that would be called into question, in any case, is that of the CICO theory!

In my opinion, the acipimox experiment doesn’t demonstrate that the CICO causality is false. What I find relevant is that Hall and Guyenet have conveniently attributed to the carbohydrate-insulin model a false causality, pretending to conclude that this model is not supported by the experimental evidence.

2.It is false that they are talking about a key concept of the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis

On the other hand we have the idea that the terms of the energy balance equation cannot respond to the action of a tissue that decides to capture fatty acids.

A key prediction of the CIM was not experimentally supported.

Note that the idea that changes in energy intake and energy expenditure are a consequence of fattening is not a key idea of ​​the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis. This is another straw man created by Hall and Guyenet to make believe that they are falsifying that theory by dismantling one of its pillars. In the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis, fattening is a physiological process in which insulin plays a fundamental role, while the terms of the energy balance do not matter a cent! We only talk about changes in the terms of the energy balance for didactic reasons, trying to make calorexics understand at once that the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis does not violate any law of physics, but not because those terms play a relevant role in this model. Of course calorexics do not understand that the energetic terms on which they have based their career are irrelevant. And they insert these terms even in the speech of those who deny the relevance of these terms.

 

Have a look at the figure above. In this model the energy balance terms cut no ice in the process of getting fat! According to the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis, the changes in the terms of the energy balance are irrelevant for fattening, unnecessary for fattening and possibly non-existent in the presence of fattening symptoms. Key idea? !! Only if you try to deceive and you just do not understand that your believes are pure and simple charlatanism.

What is relevant in the carbohydrate-insulin model? The hormonal changes and if there is fat gain or there is not. Energy balance equation, they say? What is that?

3.If you want to know if there is fat gain, you check if there is fat gain

Another important problem with Hall and Guyenet’s argument is that if you want to know if a physiological factor is making you fat, what you have to do is a controlled experiment in which that physiological factor is applied and you check if there is growth in the adipose tissue. The terms of the energy balance are not relevant for that check, except when, as is the case here, someone wants to make us believe that what does happen cannot really happen.

It’s simple: if you want to test if insulin makes you gain fat,

  1. you use insulin and
  2. you check if there is fat gain.

That’s it!

If you use a drug that is not insulin and you look for changes in secondary, unnecessary, irrelevant and probably absent markers for fat gain, in that case do not dare to say you are not trying to deceive.

For example, in this experiment, with the same energy intake and the same levels of physical activity, injecting insulin produced body fat accumulation.

 

Selección_488

Have Guyenet and Hall demonstrated that this experiment, the one I am referring to, is wrong, because what happens in it is impossible? Not at all.

This one must be also wrong: the mice injected with insulin consumed less food, but finished the experiment with a percentage of body fat that was 65% higher than in those mice that were injected saline.

 

imagen_0088

Or this one, in which with the same energy intake, the more insulin injected the more body fat accumulated:

pone

 

And we have an epidemic of poorly done studies, because in this one at 12 months the group injected with insulin had a body fat 4.2 times greater than the other, with no differences in energy intake.

zh10021367360002

There are also experiments in humans in which while the caloric intake was reduced, body fat increased, in people who were injected insulin (see).

And insulin is not the only physiological factor that can cause increased body fat without increased intake: example, example, example, example, example.

I do not want to explain further here the experiments. The links lead to blog entries where you can check their details. I go on.

4. It is false that there must be effects in the terms of the energy balance

It is not true that if a physiological factor directly produces body fat accumulation, we must detect effects on the energy intake and energy expenditure terms of the energy balance equation. The energy balance of the adipose tissue is NOT the energy balance of the whole body (see,see).

For example, in these experiments a hormonal change caused body fat gain, without the concurrence of an increase in the energy intake. I mentioned above experiments with insulin injection where we find the same. The fact that there is no increase in the caloric intake does not mean that there has been no fat gain, or in other words, to gain fat does not imply that the caloric intake has to be changed.

For example, it is possible to lose body fat while muscle mass is increased, or just the opposite (see,see), a situation in which there is not necessarily a cahnge in the difference between energy intake and energy expenditure. And yet there is fat gain!! In this experiment the mice that gained more body fat were those that gained less weight, which shows that is nonsense to think that an increase in the size of the fat tissue must be accompanied by an increase in the caloric intake and a reduction in the energy expenditure.

Another example: in ventromedial hypothalamus lesions, body fat can accumulate without changes in the body weight or in the caloric intake (see).

It’s not true, because as I said,

the energy balance of the adipose tissue is NOT the energy balance of the whole body

Everyone understands this, except, apparently, Hall and Guyenet.

5. Do we apply this criterion to other energy accumulations in tissues?

Do you think it is possible for your liver to accumulate body fat due to physiological causes that are not related to the energy balance terms, for example due to the presence of sugar and fructose in the diet? (see) Do you think that the accumulation of energy in the liver is caused by an energy intake that exceeds your energy expenditure, because Hall and Guyenet have demonstrated it must be so? So, do you think it is possible to accumulate fat in the liver due to physiological causes not related to the whole body’s energy balance equation?

Do you think that not measuring changes in the energy intake or in the energy expenditure while accumulating fat in the liver (I’m not saying that the body weight changes) would show that the cause of the fatty liver cannot be physiological? Note that not measuring it does not mean that they the changes do not exist, just that they are not seen.

How are connected the accumulation of fat in the liver and the terms of the energy balance equation for the whole body? What are the physiological mechanisms that link them?

Are they really arguing that there cannot be physiologic causes for the accumulation of body fat in a tissue? A bad argument that is used only because someone doesn’t want to back down is called an ad-hoc argument. They cannot defend their argument, but that fact has not prevented them from using to advance their agenda.

Let’s talk about anabolic steroids. They make muscle mass grow (see). Do they work through a direct physiological/hormonal action in the muscle tissue, or is that impossible, as Hall and Guyenet have demonstrated, because our body would not know how to manage having a few grams less of metabolites, the ones used in that growth? Is the increase in the energy accumulated in the tissuemediated by changes in the terms of the whole body’s energy balance, or are the terms of the whole body’s energy balance irrelevant in the growth of the tissue? If the only thing anabolic steroids do is to increase the appetite and make us sedentary, can we achieve the same results just by eating more and moving less?

6. It is false that it has to happen. Other reasons

Kevin Hall says that an excess of just one gram of fat in our food intake explains the current obesity epidemic (30 kJ /d = 7.2 kcal/d):

A small persistent average daily energy imbalance gap between intake and expenditure of about 30 kJ per day underlies the observed average weight gain (source)

I think it is important to highlight this fact to be aware of the dimension of the obesity problem: we deal with a few grams per day net accumulation in the adipose tissue.

Suppose that of the 400g of food you consume today, 1 gram goes directly to your adipose tissue. What will be the effect in the following days? Voracious hunger? An increase in your caloric intake? You will feel tired due to the lack of nutrients? Are we kidding? Is that what you actually notice when one day you consume 399 g instead of the 400 g you eat on an average day?

Have you thought about the variation in your food intake from day to day? Do you think that when you eat 1 g less than an average day this causes some response in the caloric intake that is bigger than the natural and inevitable variations in your daily caloric intake? Do you think there is such an effect if you consume 5 g less than an average day?

Apart from the above, our body “wastes” much of what we eat as body heat. And the amount is not fixed: it is adaptive. If you eat a little more or a little less, your body can adapt without any problem to the intake of that day and dissipate as heat what is left over, maybe more, maybe less than the day before. There is no reason to eat more in the next days: your body has not felt deprived of food neither of the two days. It is not true that the fact that your adipose tissue accumulates triglycerides must have an effect on your caloric intake. The variation in the amount of available nutrients can be perfectly absorbed by a very slight change in the energy expenditure. The efficiency of the human body is variable and adaptive (see,see,see,see,see,).

If instead of eating 1g less than normal, your adipose tissue stores 1g of what you eat, is your body an impossible situation? How is this situation different from eating 1g less than the average you consume? Is the second case a problem, but not the first one? That’s what Hall and Guyenet are telling us:

  • Today you eat 1 g less than yesterday —> The body has no problem at all.
  • Today your adipose tissue decides to accumulate 1 g of what you eat as body fat —> That is an impossible situation, as demonstrated by not detecting changes in the energy intake nor in the energy expenditure in an experiment with acipimox.

The body would not know what to do with 1 gram less of food, but only in the second case … Ummmm, are they serious?

7. Apart from being false, it is not measurable and may be never will be

Another fallacy is to try to draw conclusions from what not only does not have to occur, but cannot be measured either.

If today you eat 1g less than normal (it is not an erratum, it is the hypothesis of Hall and Guyenet), what changes do you expect to find in your energy intake or energy expenditure the next day? Do you think that if this effect existed, it could be measured, as a change that is distinguishable from the natural daily variations in your energy expenditure and energy intake? And how would you distinguish it from those natural variations?

What do you think is the resolution and precision of the state-of-the-art measure systems that can be used to measure the food that actually enters the body and the energy expenditure you have on a specific day? Even if you do not understand the concepts of precision and resolution, do you think that with current technology you can reliably measure that your body has spent 10 kcal less than the previous day, while controlling the actual caloric intake (food actually absorbed) with better accuracy than those 10 kcal? Are Hall and Guyenet pretending that these measures can be made in order to draw valid conclusions from them?

In any case, as I explained before, there does not even have to be an effect to measure.

8. The CICO theory cannot explain the scientific results

Hall and Guyenet are two of the greatest advocates of the energy balance charlatanism. Their ridiculous attack to the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis can only be explained by the interest of these two gentlemen to defend the dogmas on which they have based their career and their book, respectively.

Do they question their dogmas with the same intensity with which they question the carbohydrate-insulin hypothesis? I would say they do not.

If there is no local effect of insulin, unrelated to the energy balance, how is it explained that insulin injections change the distribution of body fat in the body? An effect mediated by changes in the energy intake and the energy expenditure cannot explain that observation (see).

How does the CICO theory explain the spatial correlation between insulin concentration and adiposity detected especially before insulin resistance develops? (see)

If a physiological factor cannot cause fat gain by mechanisms different of changing the caloric intake and the energy expenditure, how can this experiment be explained in which the rats that consumed half the calories than others gained more body fat? How does the CICO theory explain this experiment? It is important to highlight that the CICO theory is not what the First Law of Thermodynamics says (see).

In this experiment, there were no differences in the caloric intake, but there was greater body fat accumulation in the group injected with insulin. If we store as body fat what is left over when our body has spent to meet its needs, did the mice in one of the groups suddenly have less “energy needs”?

imagen_1964

Is it possible that the body spends what is left after we have gained body fat? (see) Have they considered this possibility? Why do they discard it? What would we expect to find in the uncoupling proteins activation in each case?

9. Conclusion

Theories have to be coherent with scientific experiments, not the other way round (see). If someone wants to say that the composition of the diet has no effect on the adipose tissue, or that there are no effects in that tissue that the calories and the distribution of macronutrients cannot explain, they must first give an explanation for what has been published in the scientific literature (see). Hundreds of perfectly controlled experiments are wrong? Really? Do we have to believe that Hall and Guyenet have not seen all that evidence?

these findings nonetheless corroborate a substantial body of evidence showing the uniquely potent fattening effect of insulin, regardless of calories consumed (source)

Hall and Guyenet have not found all that evidence published in scientific journals, but they have found an experiment with acipimox. They are amazing!

In short, Hall and Guyenet say that they have shown that what the scientific evidence shows, does not really happen. Oh my!

Note: This is not the first time that Stephan Guyenet, PhD has used BS arguments to make people believe that insulin does not make you fat (example,example,example,example,example,example). And his arguments in defense of sugar are inappropriate for someone with an academic degree (see,see).

Note: Guyenet and Hall’s paragraph has 125 words, my comment has 4000. Brandolini’s Asymmetry Principle.

Further reading:

Anuncios

Guyenet y Hall demuestran que lo que sí sucede, no puede suceder

(english version: click here)

Copio el siguiente texto del blog de Woo. Sus autores son Guyenet y Hall, más un tercero. Mis negritas.

If decreased circulating fuels caused the development of common human obesity as described by the CIM, then experimentally decreasing circulating fuels should result in increased energy intake, decreased energy expenditure, and body fat accumulation. The drug acipimox reduces FFA levels by mimicking the effect of insulin to inhibit adipocyte lipolysis. In a 6-month trial, acipimox induced a persistent 38% reduction of plasma FFA levels in adults with obesity but did not impact energy or macronutrient intake, resting energy expenditure, or body composition. Thus, a key prediction of the CIM was not experimentally supported.

Si la disminución de los combustibles circulantes causó el desarrollo de la obesidad humana común como lo describe el CIM [modelo carbohidratos-insulina], la disminución experimental de los combustibles circulantes debería dar como resultado un mayor consumo de energía, un menor gasto de energía y acumulación de grasa corporal. El fármaco acipimox reduce los niveles de FFA al imitar el efecto de la insulina para inhibir la lipólisis de los adipocitos. En un experimento de 6 meses de duración, acipimox indujo una reducción persistente del 38% de los niveles plasmáticos de FFA en adultos con obesidad, pero no afectó la ingesta de energía o macronutrientes, el gasto de energía en reposo o la composición corporal. Por lo tanto, una predicción clave del CIM no fue respaldada experimentalmente.

Según argumenta Woo, no usar resultados con insulina, cuando es claramente posible hacerlo, para demostrar algo acerca de la insulina es un claro intento de engañar (ver). Desde luego no le falta razón, pues es difícil entender cómo hacen algo así.

Básicamente lo que dice el argumento de Hall y Guyenet es que no existe ningún factor fisiológico que engorde directamente, pues se incrementaría la ingesta energética, se reduciría el gasto energético y se produciría acumulación de grasa. Y, como, según ellos, en un experimento concreto con el fármaco acipimox no se observa ninguna de las tres cosas, pues no puede suceder en ningún caso, incluida la insulina.

Para mí, que usen un fármaco (acipimox) en lugar de insulina para demostrar algo sobre la insulina, me parece relevante, pues la extensión de sus resultados a un factor fisiológico diferente, como es la insulina, implica necesariamente que lo que quieren establecer es un argumento generalizable a cualquier factor fisiológico supuestamente engordante. De otro modo Hall y Guyenet usarían exclusivamente resultados experimentales relativos a la insulina. Lo que se desprende de su texto es que están poniendo en tela de juicio la causalidad del modelo carbohidratos-insulina. Por eso hablan de la reducción del fuel circulante, algo no necesariamente causado por la insulina, y dan validez a un factor fisiológico diferente de la insulina. Están queriendo establecer un principio general, que, según ellos, la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina incumple.

En definitiva, su argumento es que

ningún factor fisiológico puede producir acumulación de energía en un tejido

porque según ellos ni la ingesta ni el gasto energético ni la acumulación de grasa pueden ser alterados por un factor fisiológico. Si pensasen que sí pueden ser alterados, no usarían acipimox en lugar de insulina. Reitero que es la causalidad de la teoría carbohidratos-insulina la que pretenden hacer creer que no tiene respaldo experimental:

a key prediction of the CIM was not experimentally supported.

una predicción clave del modelo carbohidratos-insulina no tuvo respaldo experimental

El argumento no se limita al tejido adiposo, pues la acumulación de energía en cualquier formato y en cualquier tejido dentro del cuerpo debe tener las mismas consecuencias desde el punto de vista del balance energético. Y hablan claramente de “reducción de fuel circulante” algo común a cualquier tejido que almacena metabolitos. Si se argumenta que no puede suceder para el tejido adiposo, entonces no puede suceder para ningún tejido, pues los efectos en los términos del balance energético de la acumulación/liberación de metabolitos en un tejido son, a priori, similares para todos los tejidos. De otro modo el argumento sería que cuando, por ejemplo, el hígado acumula grasa no hay ningún problema para el cuerpo en no disponer de un poco menos de grasa, pero ese mismo cuerpo no sabe qué hacer con un gramo menos de grasa si se almacena en el tejido adiposo. Absurdo.

Supongo que a estas alturas ya te estás planteando cómo es posible que hayan hecho ese planteamiento. Esto es lo que hay con Hall y Guyenet. Paso a desmenuzar el argumento, con los siguientes apartados:

  1. El argumento principal es un hombre de paja
  2. No es verdad que estén hablando de un concepto clave de la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina
  3. Si quieres saber si hay engorde, miras si hay engorde
  4. No es verdad que tenga que haber efectos en los términos del balance energético
  5. ¿Aplicamos este criterio a otras acumulaciones de energía en tejidos?
  6. No es verdad que tenga que suceder. Otras razones
  7. Aparte de no ser verdad, no es medible ni creo que lo sea nunca
  8. La teoría CICO no puede explicar los resultados científicos
  9. Conclusión

1. El argumento principal es un hombre de paja

If decreased circulating fuels caused the development of common human obesity as described by the CIM, then experimentally decreasing circulating fuels should result in increased energy intake, decreased energy expenditure, and body fat accumulation.

Si la disminución del fuel circulante causa el desarrollo de la obesidad humana común como lo describe el CIM [modelo carbohidratos-insulina], la disminución experimental de los combustibles circulantes debería dar como resultado un mayor consumo de energía, un menor gasto de energía y acumulación de grasa corporal.

¿La disminución de fuel circulante causa acumulación de grasa corporal? Pensémoslo un momento, ¡¡¡¿es eso lo que dice la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina?!!! ¿En serio? Miremos la figura, sacada de un artículo que defiende el modelo carbohidratos-insulina, ¿vemos qué causa la acumulación de grasa corporal en ese modelo?

La irrelevante, innecesaria y posiblemente inexistente reducción del fuel circulante, en cualquier caso es una posible consecuencia —¡un síntoma que a lo mejor ni existe!— de la acumulación de grasa corporal ¡no su causa! ¿Habéis leído a algún defensor de la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina decir que engordamos porque se reduce el fuel circulante? ¿En serio este argumento tiene tres firmantes? ¿No les da vergüenza? ¡¡¡¿No les da vergüenza?!!! ¿De verdad están retorciendo de esta forma lo que dice el modelo carbohidratos-insulina?

Es más, la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina dice que la insulina causa acumulación de triglicéridos en el tejido adiposo, triglicéridos que ya no estarían disponibles para el resto de tejidos, por ejemplo para ser disipados como calor en el tejido muscular (ver,ver). Si no hay engorde, es absurdo plantear que se vaya a reducir el fuel circulante a causa del engorde. ¿Se puede usar para poner en duda que esa causalidad sea posible, un experimento con acipimox que según Hall y Guyenet ¡¡¡no causó cambios en la composición corporal!!? ¿Qué cambios en la ingesta energética y el gasto energético esperaban encontrar en esas condiciones? ¡¡¡¿Qué cambios?!!!! Y argumentan que la reducción del fuel circulante, que supuestamente es la consecuencia de engordar, tampoco causó engorde. Y que no haya efectos en los términos del balance energético a causa de un engorde que no hubo para ellos es prueba de que…¡¡¡Joder con Hall y Guyenet!!!

Nótese que si no hubieran atribuido al modelo carbohidratos-insulina una causalidad falsa, diferente de la que ese modelo propone, no hubieran podido hablar del experimento con acipimox, pues en ausencia de engorde no hubiesen podido justificar su búsqueda de efectos en los términos del balance energético. Esa búsqueda sólo existe desde el momento en que se inventan que el engorde lo produce la reducción de fuel circulante. Y eso es falso.

No sólo eso. Es la teoría CICO la que propone que una reducción del fuel circulante obliga a los adipocitos a liberar grasa corporal, es decir, a adelgazar.

Es decir, Hall y Guyenet atribuyen falazmente esa causalidad al modelo carbohidratos-insulina pero es la causalidad de su propio modelo.

The drug acipimox reduces FFA levels by mimicking the effect of insulin to inhibit adipocyte lipolysis. In a 6-month trial, acipimox induced a persistent 38% reduction of plasma FFA levels

El fármaco acipimox reduce los niveles de FFA al imitar el efecto de la insulina para inhibir la lipólisis de los adipocitos. En un experimento de 6 meses, el acipimox indujo una reducción persistente del 38% en los niveles plasmáticos de ácidos grasos.

Si en un experimento un fármaco de forma sistemática reduce los ácidos grasos libres circulantes, si eso no resulta en una reducción del peso corporal, la causalidad que se pondría en entredicho, en cualquier caso, ¡es la de la teoría CICO!

Yo no creo que el experimento sirva para demostrar que la causalidad CICO sea falsa. Lo que sí me parece relevante es cómo Hall y Guyenet convenientemente han atribuido al modelo carbohidratos-insulina una causalidad falsa, pretendiendo de ahí concluir que ese modelo es contrario a la evidencia experimental.

2. No es verdad que estén hablando de un concepto clave de la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina

Por otro lado tenemos la idea de que los términos del balance energético no se pueden adaptar a la acción de un tejido que decide capturar ácidos grasos.

a key prediction of the CIM was not experimentally supported.

una predicción clave de la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina no tuvo respaldo experimental

Nótese que la idea de que los cambios en la ingesta energética y gasto energético son consecuencia del engorde no es una idea clave de la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina. Esto es otro hombre de paja creado por Hall y Guyenet para hacer creer que están falseando esa teoría al desmontar uno de sus pilares. En la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina el engorde es un proceso fisiológico en el que la insulina tiene un papel fundamental, mientras que los términos del balance energético ¡¡¡no importan un comino!!! Sólo se habla de los cambios en los términos del balance energético por cuestiones didácticas, para ver si los caloréxicos se enteran de una vez de que la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina no viola ninguna ley de la física, no porque esos términos tengan un papel relevante. Por supuesto los caloréxicos no entienden que los términos energéticos en que han basado su carrera sean irrelevantes. Y erre que erre los quieren meter hasta en el discurso de los que niegan la relevancia de esos términos.

Mira la figura anterior. ¡En este modelo el balance energético no pinta nada en el proceso de engordar! Según la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina, los cambios en los términos del balance energético son síntomas irrelevantes en el engorde, innecesarios para el engorde y posiblemente inexistentes en presencia de engorde. ¡¡¿Idea clave?!! Sólo si pretendes hacer creer lo que no es y no acabas de entender que tu ideología es pura charlatanería.

¿Qué es lo relevante en el modelo carbohidratos-insulina? Los cambios hormonales y si hay engorde o no lo hay. ¿Balance energético, dicen? ¿Qué es eso?

3. Si quieres saber si hay engorde, miras si hay engorde

Otro problema importante del argumento de Hall y Guyenet es que si quieres saber si un factor fisiológico engorda, lo que tienes que hacer es un experimento controlado en el que se aplique ese factor fisiológico y compruebas si hay crecimiento del tejido adiposo. Los términos del balance energético no son relevantes a la hora de hacer esa comprobación, salvo que, como es el caso, quieras hacer creer que has demostrado que lo que sí sucede, en realidad no puede suceder.

Es sencillo: si quieres demostrar si la insulina engorda,

  1. usas insulina y
  2. compruebas si hay engorde.

¡Punto!

Si te sales de ahí… y usas un fármaco que no es insulina y te fijas en marcadores secundarios, innecesarios, irrelevantes y probablemente ausentes en situaciones de engorde, luego no me cuentes que no la estás queriendo meterla doblada.

Por ejemplo, en este experimento, con la misma ingesta energética y los mismos niveles de actividad física, inyectar insulina produjo acumulación de grasa corporal.

Selección_488

¿Han demostrado Guyenet y Hall que este experimento que refiero está mal hecho, porque lo que en él sucede es imposible? Ni de casualidad.

Este otro entonces también es erróneo: los ratones a los que se inyectó insulina consumieron menos comida, pero acabaron el experimento con un porcentaje de grasa corporal un 65% mayor que a los que se inyectó la solución salina.

imagen_0088

O este otro, en el que con la misma ingesta energética, cuanta más insulina se inyectó más grasa corporal se acumuló:

pone

Y tenemos una epidemia de estudios mal hechos, porque en este otro a los 12 meses el grupo al que se inyectaba insulina tenía una grasa corporal un 4.2 veces mayor que el otro, sin diferencias en la ingesta energética.

zh10021367360002

También hay experimentos en humanos en los que reduciendo la ingesta se acumuló grasa corporal, en personas que se inyectaban insulina (ver).

Y no sólo la insulina puede causar aumento de la grasa corporal sin aumento de la ingesta: ejemplo, ejemplo, ejemplo, ejemplo, ejemplo.

No he querido extenderme explicando los experimentos. Los enlaces llevan a entradas del blog donde se pueden consultar los detalles de los mismos. Sigo.

4. No es verdad que tenga que haber efectos en los términos del balance energético

No es verdad que si un factor fisiológico engorda produciendo directamente acumulación de grasa corporal, haya que percibir efectos en la ingesta energética y en el gasto energético. El balance de energía en el tejido adiposo NO es el balance de energía en todo el cuerpo (ver,ver).

Por ejemplo, en estos experimentos un cambio hormonal causó engorde, sin la concurrencia de un aumento en la ingesta energética. Eso mismo lo hemos visto en los experimentos con inyección de insulina que he comentado antes. Que no haya aumento en la ingesta no significa que no haya habido engorde, o dicho de otra forma, que haya engorde no implica que la ingesta tenga que alterarse.

Por ejemplo, es posible perder grasa corporal al tiempo que se gana musculatura, o al contrario (ver,ver), una situación en la que no necesariamente hay una alteración en la diferencia ingesta-gasto. ¡¡Y sin embargo sí hay engorde!!  En este otro experimento se ganó más grasa corporal, pero menos peso, lo que demuestra absurdo presuponer que un aumento del tamaño del tejido graso tiene que venir acompañado de un aumento de la ingesta y una reducción del gasto energético.

Otro ejemplo: en las lesiones del hipotálamo ventromedial se puede acumular grasa corporal sin que haya variaciones ni en el peso corporal ni en la ingesta energética (ver).

No es verdad, porque como decía,

el balance energético en el tejido graso NO es el balance energético en el cuerpo

Lo entiende todo el mundo, menos, aparentemente, Hall y Guyenet.

5. ¿Aplicamos este criterio a otras acumulaciones de energía en tejidos?

¿Crees posible que tu hígado acumule grasa corporal por causas fisiológicas en nada relacionadas con el balance energético, por ejemplo por la presencia de azúcar y fructosa en la dieta? (ver) ¿O crees más bien que la acumulación de energía en el hígado es causada por una ingesta energética que supera tu gasto energético, porque así lo han demostrado Hall y Guyenet? Entonces, ¿crees que sí es posible acumular grasa en el hígado por causas fisiológicas desligadas del balance energético del cuerpo?

¿Crees que no percibir cambios en la ingesta energética ni en el gasto energético mientras se acumula grasa en el hígado (no estoy diciendo que cambia el peso corporal) demostraría que la causa del hígado graso no puede ser fisiológica? Nótese que no percibir no significa que no estén, sino que no se ven.

¿Qué relación guarda la acumulación de grasa en el hígado con los términos del balance energético en el cuerpo? ¿A través de qué mecanismos fisiológicos?

¿De verdad están planteando que no pueden existir causas fisiológicas para la acumulación de grasa corporal en un tejido? Un mal argumento que se usa sólo porque no te quieres bajar del burro se llama argumento ad-hoc. Van a ser incapaces de defender este argumento, lo que no les ha impedido emplearlo en esta ocasión para hacer avanzar su agenda.

Hablemos de los esteroides anabolizantes. Hacen crecer la masa muscular (ver). ¿Lo hacen mediante una actuación fisiológica/hormonal directa en el tejido muscular, o eso es imposible según han demostrado Hall y Guyenet porque el cuerpo no sabría gestionar disponer de unos gramos menos de metabolitos, los empleados en ese crecimiento? ¿Es mediado, en este caso, el incremento en la energía acumulada en el tejido por cambios en los términos del balance energético corporal, o son los términos del balance energético del cuerpo irrelevantes en el crecimiento del tejido? Si lo único que hacen los esteroides anabolizantes es aumentar el apetito y hacernos sedentarios, ¿nos podemos ahorrar pincharnos nada y directamente comer más y movernos menos?

6. No es verdad que tenga que suceder. Otras razones

Kevin Hall dice que un exceso de tan sólo un gramo de grasa en la ingesta de comida explica la actual epidemia de obesidad (30 kJ/d =7.2 kcal/d):

A small persistent average daily energy imbalance gap between intake and expenditure of about 30 kJ per day underlies the observed average weight gain (fuente)

Creo que es importante resaltar este dato para ser conscientes de la dimensión del problema: hablamos de unos pocos gramos diarios acumulados en el tejido adiposo.

Supongamos que de los 400g de comida que consumes hoy, 1 gramo va a parar directamente a tu tejido adiposo. ¿Cuál va a ser el efecto en los días siguientes? ¿Hambre voraz? ¿Aumento de la ingesta? ¿Cansancio por falta de nutrientes? ¿Estamos de broma? ¿Es eso lo que notas cuando un día consumes 399 g en lugar de los 400 g que comes en término medio?

¿Te has planteado alguna vez la variación que hay en tu ingesta de comida de un día para otro? ¿Crees que en tu cuerpo que comas 1 g menos que el día anterior causa alguna respuesta en la ingesta que sea mayor que la variación natural e inevitable en la ingesta? ¿Y si consumes 5 g menos que el día anterior?

Aparte de lo anterior, nuestro cuerpo “desperdicia” gran parte de lo que comemos como calor corporal. Y la cantidad no es fija: es adaptativa. Si comes un poco más o un poco menos, se puede adaptar sin ningún problema a la ingesta de ese día y disipar lo que sobra, quizá más, quizá menos que el día anterior, en forma de calor. Ninguna razón para que al día siguiente tengas que comer más: a tu cuerpo no le ha faltado nada ninguno de los dos díasNo es verdad que el hecho de que tu tejido adiposo acumule triglicéridos tenga que tener un efecto en la ingesta energética. La variación en la cantidad de nutrientes disponibles puede ser absorbida perfectamente por un ligerísimo cambio en el gasto energético. La eficiencia del cuerpo humano es variable y adaptativa (ver,ver,ver,ver,ver,).

Si en lugar de comer 1g menos de lo normal, tu tejido adiposo almacena 1g de lo que comes, ¿para tu cuerpo es una situación insostenible? ¿En qué se diferencia esa situación de comer 1g menos de la media que consumes? ¿El primer caso supone un problema y el segundo no? Eso es lo que nos están diciendo Hall y Guyenet:

  • Hoy comes 1 g menos que ayer —> El cuerpo ni se entera.
  • Hoy tu tejido adiposo decide acumular 1 g de lo que comes como grasa corporal —> Situación imposible, como se demuestra al no detectarse cambios en la ingesta energética y el gasto energético en un experimento con acipimox.

El cuerpo no sabría qué hacer con ese gramo menos, pero sólo en el segundo caso… Ummmm, ¿están hablando en serio?

7. Aparte de no ser verdad, no es medible ni creo que lo sea nunca

Otra falacia es pretender sacar conclusiones de lo que no sólo no tiene por qué producirse, sino que tampoco puede ser medido.

Si hoy comes 1g menos de lo normal (no es una errata, es la hipótesis de Hall y Guyenet), ¿qué cambios esperas encontrar en tu ingesta energética o en el gasto energético al día siguiente? ¿Crees que de existir ese efecto se puede medir distinguiéndolo de las variaciones naturales de un día respecto de otro en el gasto energético y la ingesta energética? ¿Y cómo lo distinguirías de esas variaciones naturales?

¿Cuál crees que es la resolución y precisión de los sistemas actuales de medida de la comida que efectivamente entra en el cuerpo y el gasto energético que has tenido un día concreto? Aunque no entiendas los conceptos de precisión y resolución, ¿crees que con la tecnología actual se puede medir de forma fiable que tu cuerpo ha gastado 10 kcal menos que el día anterior, al tiempo que se tiene controlada la ingesta calórica real (la comida realmente absorbida) con una exactitud mejor que esas 10 kcal? ¿Están pretendiendo Hall y Guyenet decirnos que están haciendo estas medidas en condiciones de extraer conclusiones válidas?

Y, en todo caso, como he explicado antes, es que ni siquiera tiene por qué haber un efecto que medir.

8. La teoría CICO no puede explicar los resultados científicos

Hall y Guyenet son dos de los máximos exponentes de la charlatanería caloréxica. Este ridículo ataque a la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina sólo se puede explicar por el interés de estos dos señores por defender los dogmas en los que han basados su carrera y su libro, respectivamente.

¿Cuestionan sus dogmas con la misma intensidad con la que cuestionan la hipótesis carbohidratos-insulina? Yo diría que no.

Si no hay un efecto local de la insulina, ajeno al balance energético, ¿cómo se explica que las inyecciones de insulina cambien el reparto de la grasa corporal en el cuerpo? Una acción mediada por cambios en la ingesta energética y el gasto energético no puede explicar esa observación (ver)

¿Cómo explica la teoría CICO la correlación espacial entre concentración de insulina y adiposidad detectada especialmente antes de que se desarrolle resistencia a la insulina? (ver)

Si no puede suceder que engordemos por una causa fisiológica ajena al balance energético, ¿cómo se explica este experimento en el que las ratas que consumían la mitad de calorías que otras ganaron más grasa corporal? ¿Cómo explica este experimento la teoría CICO? Es importante resaltar que la teoría CICO no es lo que dice la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica (ver).

En este otro experimentosin diferencias en la ingesta energética, hubo mayor acumulación de grasa corporal en el grupo al que se inyectaba insulina. ¿Si se almacena como grasa corporal lo que sobra cuando el cuerpo ha gastado para cubrir sus necesidades, ¿es que los ratones de uno de los grupos de repente tuvieron menos “necesidades energéticas”?

imagen_1964

¿O puede ser que el cuerpo gaste lo que no se ha engordado? (ver) ¿Se lo han planteado? ¿Por qué lo descartan? ¿Qué esperaríamos encontrar en la activación de las proteínas desacopladoras en cada caso?

9. Conclusión

Las teorías tienen que ser coherentes con los experimentos científicos, no al contrario (ver). Si alguien pretende argumentar que la composición de la dieta no tiene efectos en el tejido graso, que no hay efectos que las calorías y la distribución de macronutrientes no puedan explicar, tienen primero que dar una explicación para lo que está publicado en la literatura científica (ver). ¿Cientos de experimentos perfectamente controlados son erróneos? ¿En serio? ¿Tenemos que creer que Hall y Guyenet no han visto toda esa evidencia?

estos hallazgos corroboran, sin embargo, una cantidad sustancial de evidencia que muestra el excepcionalmente potente efecto engordante de la insulina, independientemente de las calorías consumidas (fuente)

Hall y Guyenet tampoco han encontrado toda esa evidencia publicada en las revistas científicas, pero sí han encontrado un experimento con acipimox. ¡Vaya par de fenómenos!

En definitiva, Hall y Guyenet dicen haber demostrado que no puede suceder lo que la evidencia científica dice que sí sucede. Qué bien.

Nota: No es la primera vez que Stephan Guyenet, PhD ha empleado argumentos basura para hacer creer que la insulina no engorda (ejemplo,ejemplo,ejemplo,ejemplo,ejemplo,ejemplo). Y sus argumentos en defensa del azúcar son impropios de alguien con un título universitario (ver).

Nota: el párrafo de Guyenet y Hall tiene 125 palabras, mi comentario 4000. Principio de Asimetría de Brandolini.

Leer más:

¿Qué dice la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica? (III)

Como he explicado en la segunda parte de esta entrada,

la teoría CICO NO es la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica,

ni es, por tanto, esencialmente correcta, ni es “lo que dice la física”, ni es una obviedad indiscutible.

Lo que quiero hacer en esta segunda parte de la entrada es resaltar cómo ésta es de hecho la charlatanería que están divulgando los gurús caloréxicos:

Any energy that’s left over after the body has used what it needs is stored as body fat. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

Cualquier energía que queda después de que el cuerpo ha utilizado lo que necesita es almacenada como grasa corporal

No dice que se gasta lo que queda después de que el tejido adiposo ha almacenado lo que necesita, ¿verdad?

When calorie expenditure decreases and calorie intake increases, the energy balance equation leaves only one possible outcome: fat gain. We gained fat as we ate more calories than we needed to remain lean, given our physical activity level. In other words, we overate“. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

Cuando disminuye el gasto calórico y aumenta la ingesta calórica, la ecuación del balance energético deja solamente un resultado posible: ganancia de grasa. Hemos ganado grasa porque hemos consumido más calorías de las necesitábamos para permanecer delgados, dado nuestro nivel de actividad física. En otras palabras, hemos comido de más.

Es clarísimo: fija falazmente (ver) ingesta y gasto energéticos y deduce que el tejido adiposo responde a los cambios en los dos primeros. Habla de “exceso calórico” como causa de la obesidad: eso es la teoría CICO.

When you eat more calories than you burn, the excess calories are primarily shunted into your adipose tissue. Your adiposity, or body fatness, increases. It really is as simple as that. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

Cuando consumes más calorías de las que quemas, el exceso de calorías es principalmente empujado al tejido adiposo. Tu adiposidad o grasa del cuerpo, aumenta. Es realmente tan simple como eso.

Es el “exceso de calorías” lo que se almacena como grasa corporal: este comportamiento fisiológico es la definición de la teoría CICO (ver).

Las dos siguientes citas las analizo en conjunto:

for insulin to cause fat gain, it must either increase energy intake, decrease energy expenditure, or both. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

the insulin hypothesis is not consistent with basic thermodynamics.Stephan Guyenet, PhD

para que la insulina cause ganancia de grasa, debe incrementar la ingesta energética, disminuir el gasto energético, o ambos.

la hipótesis de la insulina no es consistente con la termodinámica básica

Si crees —erróneamente— que el tejido adiposo acumula la diferencia entre lo ingerido y lo gastado, crees que cualquier factor que cause ganancia de peso (en este caso la insulina) tiene que tener efectos fisiológicos directos en el apetito o en el gasto energético. No concibes que la insulina pueda engordar directamente, al margen y con independencia de los términos del balance energético. Y si crees que los resultados científicos no confirman ese efecto, que sólo tú crees necesario que exista, deduces —erróneamente— que esa idea no es compatible con las leyes de la termodinámica. En realidad, esa idea no es compatible con la teoría CICO. La idea de que la insulina engorda encaja perfectamente en la otra formulación que vimos en la segunda parte de esta entrada, que también es compatible con la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica (ver).

Otro ejemplo: cuando crees que la teoría CICO es la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica misma, crees que es obviamente correcta y que es la simple constatación de un hecho físico: que la energía no puede desaparecer. Y no entiendes que la gente ponga en duda tus dogmas:

Ni CICO es erróneo ni tampoco es lo único que importa. Hay más factores. Pero con la materia y la energía, 2+2 son 4. Óscar Picazo

CICO es física y no es falso. Los balances de materia y energía son los que son. Óscar Picazo

El balance calorías ingeridas – calorías gastadas determina el peso. Óscar Picazo

balance de materia y energía. Se aplica a cualquier sistema físico. El ser humano lo es y no escapa a estas leyes. La causa última de ganancia o perdida es CICO. Óscar Picazo

El único problema que creen los caloréxicos que existe con su ideología es que al haber muchos factores implicados en los términos del balance energético, se pueden no estimar correctamente estos términos. Aparentemente no son conscientes de que el problema es que se están inventando el comportamiento del cuerpo humano al confundir su teoría con lo que dicen las leyes de la física:

sigue siendo balance energético. Tu cuerpo gasta una energía y consume otra energía. Lo q está mal es el cálculo q se hace de calorías que consumimos pero el balance existe. Jorge García Bastida

Otra cosa es qué factores afectan a la ganancia, cuales a la pérdida, y si somos capaces de establecer la ecuación del balance sin que se nos escape ningún factor. Eso es lo complejo. Óscar Picazo

Por mucho que los caloréxicos crean que están teniendo en cuenta muchos factores, al final del día siempre acaban en la misma solución, que es que “comiendo menos” se puede gestionar el peso corporal, pues esta conclusión está implícita en el error de base, que es confundir la teoría CICO con la Primera Ley de la Termodinámica y darla, entonces, por indiscutiblemente correcta. Cuando entiendes ese error y te planteas que la causalidad puede ser diferente de la que la teoría CICO propone, entiendes que reducir la ingesta energética no es la solución obvia al problema.

En definitiva, la teoría CICO es una idea pseudocientífica que no puede ser la base del tratamiento de la obesidad ni un minuto más (ver,ver).

Con la causalidad de esta segunda formulación, entender la causa fisiológica que hace crecer el tejido adiposo es la prioridad para revertirlo o para que deje de producirse. Entender la causa fisiológica es lo que se hace con todos los crecimientos de tejidos en los seres vivos, patológicos o no: todos son procesos fisiológicos, no energéticos, que se entienden hablando de las causas reales, hormonales/fisiológicas, que causan el crecimiento. Ningún crecimiento se entiende hablando del balance energético porque ningún crecimiento es un problema energético.

La teoría CICO no es una ley de la física. Y la estamos usando para tratar la obesidad como si lo fuera.

Basta ya. Los obesos no merecemos esto.

Leer más:

Aviso a los caloréxicos: ¡¡el gurú os acaba de dejar tirados!!

Vuestro gurú de referencia os deja tirados. Guyenet explica que no hay razón basada en las leyes de la termodinámica para suponer que se puede controlar el peso corporal contando calorías. Dice que es una ¡¡¡hipótesis!!! confirmada hasta ahora de forma empírica y aproximada:

Si los caloréxicos seguís insistiendo en que la teoría del balance energético deriva de las leyes de la física, os acabáis de quedar solitos en el nivel 1 de la charlatanería caloréxica (ver). ¡Guyenet está en el nivel 2! Os manda recuerdos.

Primer corolario: la teoría del balance energético es pseudociencia, pues se ha contado como si fuera una teoría derivada de leyes inviolables de la física y ahora uno de sus principales promotores dice que no es así, que sólo es una hipótesis.

“La pseudociencia es aquella afirmación, creencia o práctica que es presentada incorrectamente como científica, pero que no sigue un método científico válido, no puede ser comprobada de forma fiable, o carece de estatus científico.”

Creo que habría que informar a la comunidad científica de que se trata de una teoría empírica, sin base teórica que la respalde. O, si os parece, podemos seguir otro siglo intentando tratar la obesidad con esta charlatanería (ver). ¿Os parece correcto tratar a la gente con pseudociencia?

Segundo corolario: si la teoría del balance energético no deriva legítimamente de leyes inviolables, no hay razón para suponer que el comportamiento a largo plazo de la restricción calórica es el que sus promotores afirman. Hay que exigir esa evidencia científica a largo plazo a los promotores de esta pseudociencia, igual que se exige a los homeópatas que demuestren que sus productos funcionan. Si los resultados a largo plazo de la dieta hipocalórica fracasan, la hipótesis se demuestra falsa e inútil.

Tercer corolario: no se puede seguir tratando a los clientes obesos con dieta hipocalórica ni un minuto más. Es IMPRESCINDIBLE que exista evidencia científica de que la dieta funciona ANTES de ponerla en práctica, al igual que se le exige a cualquier otro tratamiento médico (o, como mínimo, sería deseable que se le exigiera a cualquier otro tratamiento). Ha desaparecido el aval de las todopoderosas leyes de la física.

Si alguien cree que estoy malinterpretando a Guyenet, que no se esfuerce mucho por esa vía: ante la pregunta de si su teoría deriva de leyes inviolables de la física o si, por el contrario, es un resultado empírico, los caloréxicos no tienen escapatoria: si dicen que deriva de las leyes de la física, hay cientos de experimentos en animales (¡mismas leyes de la física!) que demuestran que su teoría es pura charlatanería, y si dicen que es un resultado empírico, ¡¡no pueden dar por supuesto que funciona empleando sus típicos juegos de palabras falaces!!: no puedes demostrar con palabras lo que tiene como única base resultados empíricos: tienen que aportar evidencia de funcionamiento a largo plazo en personas. Y, por ahora, tienen toda la evidencia en contra (ver). Si no veis salida es porque no la hay.

Por favor, si eres caloréxico, aclárate con tus gurús antes de seguir engañando a la gente. Vuestra charlatanería no deriva legítimamente de las leyes de la física: es pseudociencia. Habla con Guyenet, PhD y que te lo explique 🙂

Como comentario final, es obvio que Guyenet sigue sin entender nada de nada. Se refugia en la única salida que tiene en este momento para seguir defendiendo su charlatanería. No olvidemos que este tipo es autor de estas joyas:

1. “the insulin hypothesis is not consistent with basic thermodynamics”. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

la hipótesis de la insulina no es consistente con la termodinámica básica

(Es incompatible con la termodinámica básica, ¿pero ahora resulta que su teoría es sólo una hipótesis que él cree confirmada empíricamente? Bueno, si es que se pilla antes a un mentiroso que a un cojo)

2. “Any energy that’s left over after the body has used what it needs is stored as body fat”. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

Cualquier energía que queda después de que el cuerpo ha utilizado lo que necesita es almacenada como grasa corporal

(¿Es eso lo que dice la evidencia científica que sucede? A mí me parece más bien el fruto de creer que estás defendiendo la primera ley de la termodinámica… pero él no defiende esa ley, dice…)

3. “When calorie expenditure decreases and calorie intake increases, the energy balance equation leaves only one possible outcome: fat gain. We gained fat as we ate more calories than we needed to remain lean, given our physical activity level. In other words, we overate“. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

Cuando disminuye el gasto calórico y aumenta la ingesta calórica, la ecuación del balance energético deja solamente un resultado posible: ganancia de grasa. Hemos ganado grasa porque hemos consumido más calorías de las necesitábamos para permanecer delgados, dado nuestro nivel de actividad física. En otras palabras, hemos comido de más.

(Nuevamente, ¿es eso lo que se deduce de la evidencia científica? Pues guarda gran parecido con la causalidad inventada desde el lenguaje por parte de los caloréxicos que creen estar defendiendo una ley inviolable)

4. “for insulin to cause fat gain, it must either increase energy intake, decrease energy expenditure, or both“. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

para que la insulina cause ganancia de grasa, debe incrementar la ingesta energética, disminuir el gasto energético, o ambos. 

(¿debe? Ummmm ¿Ese “debe” lo deduce de resultados empíricos, dice?) 

Mensajes que según dice ahora, no tienen otra base que la evidencia empírica. Sería cómico si no hubiera tanta gente cuyos problemas de peso están siendo tratados con la pseudociencia que Guyenet defiende. Y lo que nos queda, si seguimos riendo las gracias de los que promueven esa hipótesis como si fuera indiscutible.

Leer más:

 

La charlatanería pseudocientífica de Guyenet es compatible con hablar de hormonas…

Al menos eso afirma él:

También la homeopatía es compatible con la medicina “convencional”, según los homeópatas…

¿Cuáles son los mecanismos fisiológicos mediante los cuáles nuestra ingesta energética afecta a toda la energía almacenada en nuestro cuerpo, en todas sus formas? ¿Ninguna respuesta?

¿Cómo mide/detecta nuestro cuerpo el “exceso” o “déficit calórico”? ¿Qué parte del cuerpo lo mide/detecta? ¿Qué órgano en concreto? ¿Cómo se transmite la orden a un adipocito de que tiene que acumular grasa? ¿Quién decide el reparto de qué tiene que hacer cada adipocito en concreto? ¿Qué órgano decide que el exceso calórico debe ser convertido en músculo o glucógeno y no grasa corporal? ¿Ninguna respuesta?

La magia de las calorías no se rebaja a explicar mundanos mecanismos fisiológicos: sucede y ya está. Gallinas que entran menos gallinas que salen y no preguntes más.

Cuando el gasto calórico disminuye y el consumo de calorías aumenta, la ecuación del balance energético deja sólo un posible resultado: la ganancia de grasa corporal (Stephan Guyenet, PhD)

La teoría del balance energético es pseudociencia basada en falacias y es incapaz de explicar los mecanismos fisiológicos que la implementan. ¿Compatible con hablar de hormonas? Que no nos vendan la moto.

Esta propuesta de Guyenet no es ningún avance: es lo de siempre. Los caloréxicos creen que las hormonas juegan un papel en la obesidad porque afectan al apetito y, por tanto, a la ingesta energética (ver). Ésa es la compatibilidad de la que nos hablan.

No existe un punto medio virtuoso entre ciencia y pseudociencia (ver). Ciencia y pseudociencia no son compatibles.

Leer más:

Crónicas caloréxicas (V): Stephan Guyenet, PhD

Guyenet, PhD es un conocido defensor de la pseudociencia del balance energético. En esta entrada voy a comentar uno de sus argumentos:

for insulin to cause fat gain, it must either increase energy intake, decrease energy expenditure, or both. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

para que la insulina cause ganancia de grasa, debe incrementar la ingesta energética, disminuir el gasto energético, o ambos. 

¿”Debe” porque eso se deduce de las leyes de la física?

Cambiemos de hormona:

para que la hormona del crecimiento haga crecer los tejidos tiene que aumentar la ingesta energética, reducir el gasto energético, o ambos.

La hormona del crecimiento hace crecer nuestros tejidos aumentando nuestro apetito, reduciendo nuestro gasto energético o ambas cosas. Y el cuerpo se ve entonces obligado a crecer por ese “exceso calórico”, actuando según la ecuación del balance energético. ¡La energía no puede desaparecer! ¡Las leyes de la física también se cumplen en los seres vivos! ¿Es eso lo que se deduce de la primera ley de la termodinámica? ¿Es eso lo que dice nuestro conocimiento de la fisiología que sucede? (ver) ¿Es negar esta clamorosa estupidez negar el cumplimiento de las leyes de la física? ¿Hay una ley de la física para la hormona del crecimiento y una diferente para la insulina?

for insulin to cause fat gain, it must either increase energy intake, decrease energy expenditure, or both. Stephan Guyenet, PhD

para que la insulina cause ganancia de grasa, debe incrementar la ingesta energética, disminuir el gasto energético, o ambos. 

Increíble, ¿verdad?

La teoría del balance energético no es una ley de la física. Es charlatanería. En cuanto se rasca mínimamente todo lo que sale es morralla.

Leer más:

¿Están causando los expertos en obesidad la epidemia de obesidad?

Los obesos somos habitualmente culpados por nuestra condición. Los expertos en obesidad dicen que somos obesos porque comemos demasiado y nos movemos muy poco. E insisten en que la adhesión al régimen alimentario es clave y que cualquier dieta puede hacer que se pierda peso siempre y cuando se mantenga la dieta a largo plazo. Si tienes obesidad la culpa es tuya porque te pasaste comiendo y la culpa de no poder adelgazar también es tuya porque eres incapaz de mantener en el tiempo una dieta que lo arregle (ejemplo,ejemplo).

Los expertos en obesidad también culpan a la industria alimentaria con el argumento de que vende productos baratos que son demasiado apetecibles y que tienen demasiadas calorías (ejemplo) o a las madres de los niños obesos, con el argumento de que sus hijos están gordos porque ellas no se han dado cuenta de que estaban cogiendo peso (ejemplo).

Señalar a falsos culpables es perpetuar el problema pues impide combatir la verdadera causa y nos aleja de encontrar tratamientos que sí funcionen. 

¿Quiénes son los verdaderos culpables?

Todos los planteamientos, todo lo que los expertos creen saber del problema de la obesidad, está basado en descomunales errores de razonamiento. Todo lo que nos están contando sobre qué hacer para no engordar o qué hacer para adelgazar no es más que patética pseudociencia.

 

¿Quiénes son los verdaderos culpables?

“Tragedia es el momento en que el héroe descubre su verdadera naturaleza”

Tragedia es el momento en que el héroe descubre su verdadera identidad. Aristóteles.

La hamartia es, en la poética aristotélica, el error o defecto “trágico” que acaba causando la caída o desgracia del héroe. Hamartia puede ser un defecto del carácter, como la arrogancia o la excesiva confianza en la propia capacidad, o puede ser un error de juicio, como basar la propia carrera en la defensa de una teoría obviamente errónea.

Los héroes de la pseudociencia del balance energético

Tragedia es el momento en que los expertos que han estado defendiendo una idea estúpida como si derivara de leyes inviolables de la física descubren cuál es su verdadera identidad, su verdadera naturaleza, su verdadera capacidad para entender el problema, su verdadero papel en la epidemia de obesidad.

Tragedia es cuando estos expertos descubren que llevan años defendiendo charlatanería y cometiendo inexplicables errores de razonamiento.

Tragedia es cuando descubren que no son el héroe sino la causa del problema.

Su caída en desgracia, su tragedia, es esperanza para los que tenemos problemas de peso.

Leer más: